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Hawker/Kopitiam Eats

Hawker/Kopitiam Eats

As Singaporeans, we just love food, especially when it comes to our hawker/food court/kopitiam fare. A list featuring not only the conventional for the true local, but also for anyone looking for special finds as well.
Xing Wei Chua
Xing Wei Chua

Returned back to Keong Saik Bakery pretty recently because they had since also done their very own rendition of the Burnt Cheesecake. Going for the usual version rather than the Matcha variant or the other one which is a combination of both, the Burnt Cheesecake is hugely satisfying with its light creaminess and very slight cheesiness from the use of four different cheeses. Not being particularly dense, its pretty easy to eat with its smoothness — coupling that with a slight hint of char for that "burnt" feel, it's a pretty well-made version that I would not mind having again. Yet another item which hits the mark here, as always.

4 Likes

From Tong Shun at Jalan Kayu, which seems to be a fairly new establishment which had opened along the same stretch of eateries as Soon Huat Bak Kut Teh. Having their focus on their roast meat offerings, it is said that their recipe for their roast meats are from Ipoh, Malaysia.

Between the two, we felt that the Char Siew left a very memorable impression — done in true Malaysian style, the Char Siew was sweet, juicy, tender and succulent; the cut served being fatty and melt-in-the-mouth yet carrying enough bite. Coated in a sweet and sticky sauce on the exterior, the Char Siew is pretty much stellar in its own right — very flavourful and a must-have indeed. In contrast, the Roast Pork was a little less outstanding; no doubt done well considering how it does not come with porky stench. That being said, the Roast Pork came with a slightly leaner cut as compared to the Char Siew; still savoury, though the crackling skin could be more crisp overall. Quite impressed with what we had ordered here for the most part, including the Fragrant Signature Fried Rice that came with loads of seafood (i.e. scallops, sliced fish and prawns) for $8.80 — somewhere which I am most inclined to visit yet again!

2 Likes

Hadn't posted something quite like this in a long while so thought, why not? Just a pretty generic dish at the food court from the Japanese stall here — something that is pretty satisfying if one isn't too picky on what they get.

Essentially rather similar to the Kaki Fuyong of Ngee Ann Polytechnic and Nanyang Polytechnic which was all the rage back in the day; coming with a choice of either Teriyaki Chicken, Pork Chop, Salmon or Ebi, we opted for the Teriyaki Chicken which was all crisp on the exterior whilst juicy within. Drenched in a Teriyaki sauce, the Teriyaki sauce provided a savoury hint that compliments the thin layer of egg omelette beneath; all served atop the hotplate. Being the more souped up version of the Kaki Fuyong, this version comes with Nacho Cheese sauce drizzled above the omelette; something that will catch the attention of students and hipsters alike — that touch which is oh-so-sinful, but satisfying. Of course this isn't anywhere near authentically Japanese, but it certainly makes for something comforting and well-portioned for a convenient meal round the neighbourhood.

1 Like

Being a stall by the same folks behind the more well-known To-Ricos Guo Shi which had recently received their Michelin Bib Gourmand title in this year's listing, this is from To-Ricos Thai Kway Chap; also at Old Airport Road Food Centre, which focuses on Thai Kway Chap instead (much to the likes of Yaowarat Thai Kway Chap at Upper Serangoon Road; probably the first store in Singapore to focus on such an offering) .

While the Signature Thai Kwap Chap would be the one that comes with all the goodies including pig skin and innards, I opted for the Thai Kway Chap with Roasted Pork for I am not quite the innards type of guy and just happy to stick to big meats instead. Featuring simply rolled rice noodles in a broth and coming with Roasted Pork slices, the Thai Kway Chap with Roasted Pork was a decent eat; the broth being light and savoury with a slight peppery flavour while the rolled rice noodles were easy to eat whilst being springy and chewy — carried a good bite. The roast pork was more on the leaner side; gave a meaty bite while the skin still managed to retain some crispness despite absorbing the flavours of the broth. Patrons can add in condiments like peanuts, Thai Chili Powder and coriander which is made available at the side of the stall; the chili powder being rather spicy and providing the bowl with a great kick for those who would like their Thai Kway Chap to tingle their taste buds, while the coriander helps to provide a good contrast that breaks away the savoury notes of the broth. A good choice for a light eat for those who prefer items with a slightly cleaner flavour in general.

4 Likes

From 146 Timsum Handmade Bao at the above-mentioned coffeeshop at Blk 146 Potong Pasir Avenue 1. Having tried the Char Siew Pau some time back randomly when we walked past the stall, the Char Siew Pau still holds well to what we had remembered it to be. A fluffy bun with a skin of balanced thickness, the bun was not too thick nor too thin, whilst coming with a good portion of fillings within. Chunks of meat that are not too fatty nor lean are all drenched in a sweet and sticky sauce; the sauce being aptly sweet yet savoury, keeping the fillings from being overly dry — one of the nicer coffeeshop dimsum stall Paus out there.

1 Like

If there is one food item that is easiest to find in Sim Lim Square apart from the usual economical rice stalls, then it would be Salted Egg Yolk Chicken Rice.

A good alternative to Taste Good and The Rice Bowl's Buttermilk Chicken Rice (because its always so crowded during lunch hours), the Mini Wok stall at Broadway Food Court at the basement is also one that satisfies those cravings. Featuring chunks of fried chicken drenched in that creamy yet saltish sauce, it also carries a slight sweetness that helps to balance things out a little for that sweet-savoury note. Coming with crisp curry leaves and chili padi, these enhances those flavours even further by adding a contrast with its fragrance and mild spiciness. No doubt this version does not come with as much sauce as some other places does to allow one to just slather it all over the rice, nor does this variant feature actual chunks of salted egg, but this is a variant that does well enough to satisfy those cravings whenever it hits.

4 Likes

From 碳烤黑叉烧 at Kim San Leng coffeeshop at Blk 511 Bishan Street 13; decided to pop by randomly for dinner after walking by and the stall caught my eye.

Went for the Wanton Noodles and felt that the wantons were more of the catch compared to the Char Siew. Whilst the Char Siew were glazed in a thick and sweet sauce, carrying a hint of char from the charcoal grilling, the meat was more on the leaner side — would have been perfect if fattier portions were to be served for a melt-in-the-mouth texture. The wantons were generously packed; instead of coming with just a slather of meat like what other places may have served up, the wantons do carry a bite and the natural sweetness from the shrimp within; very fresh and rather delicious. The noodles come pretty springy, tossed in soy sauce — a little alkaline, but the chili by the side does help to take it away when tossed together with the noodles. A pretty decent eat to have whilst in the area.

2 Likes

From The Social Outcast; a new Western stall hidden at Jin Bao Coffeeshop at Blk 280 Tampines Street 22 that focuses much on their burger offerings — all grilled in charcoal and smoked hickory wood.

Featuring a beef patty, caramelised French onions, sauteed mushrooms in between Brioche Buns, the star of the show is undoubtedly the beef patty; not only was it juicy as described in the menu, the patty came tightly packed and held up well without being crumbly; the beef also was in no way gamey, yet savoury and pretty flavourful alongside the sweet caramelised onions and earthy sauteed mushrooms — all that being undisturbed from any greens nor cheese that may attempt to steal the show, while the buns were light and fluffy. Fries come standard with every burger order; not the best given how they are a tad limp and not exactly fluffy — neither here nor there. Still, the burger is a pretty good catch; pretty affordable at $9.50 especially for something that is smoked and grilled with charcoal fire — quite something you would never expect to find at your local neighbourhood coffeeshop.

3 Likes

Had the chance to go to Changi Village recently; probably the thing that I had been looking forward to the entire day so much that I have had to get it despite it meaning I would have to eat it without feeling too hungry and that it would make for a rather early dinner.

Really like Weng Kee's rendition for its thick, savoury sauce that it comes with, with the chili helping to add a slightly different dimension of savouriness and also a light hint of spiciness that gives a little kick to tickle the tastebuds; should be pretty manageable even for those with a slightly lower tolerance to spiciness. The fried chicken was not as crisp as I wanted it to be, but does work as a meaty compliment to the Hor Fun overall. I know of some who find this a little overhyped, but this is great for me for the nostalgia factor; a good alternative for another rendition of it that I know I probably will never have a taste of ever again.

6 Likes

From Sin Cuisine 新一代 at Koufu Cathay Cineleisure; the name also runs another branch at Ang Mo Kio where Roast Paradise used to be.

Going for their Roast Pork and Char Siew Noodles, the latter was pretty much almost the same as what Roast Paradise offers; the caramelised exterior of the Char Siew being fairly sweet, whilst also carrying a slight crispness on certain parts, while the meat was fatty and melt-in-the-mouth — great to have even on its own. The Roast Pork was a little different using a different spice rub that is still immensely savoury though may be a little dry to some, with a crisp skin over the top. Noodles come tossed in a light sauce that is slightly different from that of the usual ones that are used in other stalls, though still rather savoury though not particularly heavy-handed; the noodles also differing slightly from the typical roast meat noodles by carrying a firmer texture with a bite. A pretty underrated option in the food court, and certainly a value-for-money eat at the usual food court prices; something I would certainly have again another time if I am in the area.

4 Likes

From 51 Minced Meat Noodles; a new stall that serves up fusion Minced Meat Noodles which had recently opened their doors at Yishun Park Hawker Centre.

They had ran out of Mee Pok and Mee Kia when we made our visit; went for the Kway Teow option which was not too bad a choice though unconventional — the clean flavours of the smooth and slurpy noodles did allow the sauce to shine with its vinegary notes amidst the savouriness and spiciness which should be of a comfortable level to most whom are able to go for moderate levels of spiciness. The minced meat noodles also come with sole fish for a crisp texture and saltish flavour, whilst also coming with meatballs and minced pork. The fusion element seems to come form the slices of Japanese Cha Shu that is included; thought they were tender and did not carry a porky stench whilst being flavourful — a pretty good addition to the otherwise pretty usual minced meat noodle.

1 Like

From The Tipsy Wolves situated at Bistro 8 along Foch Road at Jalan Besar, also known as the coffeeshop where Kok Kee Wanton Noodles is reopening, and also where Dynasty Fried Porridge is also located now.

Really impressed by the quality of the Western fare served up here; the Grilled Pork Belly comes with other elements such as Butter Cooked Wong Bok, Roasted Potato, Spice Caramel and Burnt Noisette. The slab of pork belly comes glistening here from its own juices; well-crusted on the exterior. Unlike other places that uses a sous-vide technique to prepare the dish completely, I liked how this version retains the some of the fibrous quality of the meat without being overly tender, providing some texture to the meat while the fatty parts still remains gelatinous and melt-in-the-mouth. Roasted potatoes provided a good bite, whilst being well-seasoned for flavour, but my favourite elements here had to be the spice caramel and the butter cooked Wong Bok; the former helping to add that pretty unique hint of sweetness that works so well with the savoury meat, whilst also carrying a hint of umami with the Wong Bok. Looking forward to be back to try the other dishes they have to offer!

6 Likes

Up, down and everywhere around for food.

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