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Singapore Heritage

Singapore Heritage

Old school food that we, or our parents grow up with. Hope they'll be preserved!
Justin Teo
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Enjoying mornings like this. And the kueh dar-dar was so good. Soft skin encasing fresh white grated coconut with just a little gula melaka. Very well balanced so it's aren't too sweet.

This is so good. Seemingly simple crab, steamed and chilled, but the sweetness of the crab butter and how easily all the flesh came off the shells just showed how fresh and well executed this dish is.
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Definitely deserving to be their signature dish, and I was told by the owner that they were the first to create this dish in Singapore when Lee Do Restaurant started in the 1960s.
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This is taken during an invited tasting.

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This is so cute! It's like a mega tu tu kueh that looks round and cuddly. This is also my favourite cake out of the 4 we tried that day. Made from coconut vanilla, gula melaka and almond. It's not only an instagrammable cake, but a delightful one too :)

Did you know Coconut Club, famous or infamous for their $12.80 nasi lemak serves kueh kosui too?
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The texture is pretty good - soft, mushy and with enough bounce. It's flavoured by gula melaka but it isn't too sweet. But qualm is that the taste of alkaline is present here, so my favourite kueh kosui is still from Maxwell Market.

Recommending popiah, a popular Singaporean snack, to my overseas Burpple users here. It resembles a Mexican burrito but we use a thinner skin made from wheat flour, with fillings consisting of crunchy vege goodness such as turnips, beansprouts, lettuce, grounded peanuts, definitely no cheese, with chilli optional. It also shares many characteristics as Asian springrolls.
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I like my popiah skin to be thin with the right balance of ingredients, but don't mind an overdose of peanuts. I usually take my popiah without chilli so that I can focus on the sweet sauce, but was recommended to have chilli on this because it was spicy and sharp. Indeed, I love the strong chilli here.
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I have not tried really good popiahs yet, that one was where the popular Yishun 928 laksa is, and at the best I've had was at Qiji. Anyone has a good popiah to recommend?

I've two favourite otah stall in Singapore, and this is one of it.
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The mackerel used is fresh and you could taste its delicate sweetness, because the spice used isn't overly spice though fragrant. Although the fish paste and spice used is the same, the $0.60 version is more smoky while the $1.20 version is more moist. The difference is due to the use of different types of leafs used while grilling the otah.
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Those who wants their otah to be more spicy may instead visit Tan Beng. Both serves great otah for different reasons!

This milk tea surprised me, and you must order this if you love milk tea. And that's besides the so old school but so elegant porcelain tea set used!
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The milk tea has a floral fragrance resembling that of white coffee, and I really love the consistency of the milk. Served with a kueh bahulu which was really crispy, yet fluffy, and very eggy.

This is my favorite breakfast, very Singaporean, very common, but very comforting.. but with a twist.
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This house made Hainanese style kaya was smooth, non lumpy, and caramelised. Truffle scent was evident, sea salt was finely grained so that made for an interesting texture. The salt was light so it didn't overpower the sweetness we were accustomed to in our traditional kaya.
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I found out about this place thanks to @Burpple and @CraveSingapore. We also learnt kaya making at this stop, hosted by owner Jo Ann from @vanillabarandcafe. They don't sell kaya toast at Vanilla Cafe but you can have this kaya with their mini pancakes.
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#breakfast #kayatoast #jiaklocal #uncagestreetfood

This is a gem - Chef Lam Kun and his old school tim sum! Affectionately known as 根叔, he was the head chef of a prominent restaurant before starting this humble stall. His passion drives him to insist on traditional but tedious way of cooking (eg, frying raw rice for >1hr till it's cooked as glutinous rice)
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Yam cake should be i) soft, ii) moist, yet iii) flavourful, and this hits all three. The winning consistency was dense, but mushy and light. Gen Shu has many other gems not featured here - glutinous rice, dumplings, siew mai, and the thick but translucent congee.. I love that congee too, on my!
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Many thanks to Burpple, we discovered many crouching tigers and hidden dragons in Toa Payoh during the #TastyTastemakerTour! 😋😋
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Toa Payoh Vista Market
Gen Shu Hong Kong Delights # 01-03
Opening Hours: 6am still sold out, come early!

This is a Singaporean snack; it's a deep fried pastry filled with curry potatoes, chicken, and a slice of a hard boiled egg. We love different parts of it - some love the twirly curls at the curved edge because they're more crispy, some hunt for the few bits of chicken meat, some for that single slice of egg.
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Katong Curry Puff is managed by an old couple who make them fresh in store everyday for the past 30 years. As such some crusts are thicker while some are thinner. The thicker crusts are rather doughy, so I prefer the thinner ones for a better ratio of potato to crust. They're not the best but there's so much heart in these puffs.. the couple's dedication to this craft and their lovely partnership in this over all these years.
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I also remember, as a kid when my mum and I share a curry puff, she would pass it to me as soon as the egg is revealed 💕

Ang ku kueh [$0.80 each], literally translates as "red tortoise pastry". I'll first talk about ang ku kueh in general, then describe why I think Everton's has the most popular ang ku kueh in Singapore.
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Ang ku kueh is a traditional Singaporean kueh, used to celebrate baby's first month or an elderly's birthday. Traditional ang ku kueh comes only in red (which to the Chinese is auspicious), printed with a tortoise on top, symbolizing longevity. The skin is made from glutinous rice flour that's soft and sticky, and filled with mung bean or ground peanuts with sugar. So you get it - soft, chewy, sticky and a little sweet, so it's teeth-friendly for the children and the elderly.
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To me, the magic of Everton's ang ku kueh is really in its skin - really soft and thin skin which is handmade daily. It comes in colours other than red, because they also have flavours such as salted bean, corn, coconut, yam and durian. I wanted a tasting of all their flavours hence I bought every colour on display, but the next time I would just get the ones with peanuts.
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Ang ku kueh has since evolved that you needn't wait for celebrations to eat them, as they're available for sale whole year round. However, I also fear that they're in danger of being forgotten by younger generations. I can't even remember when was the last time I've eaten ang ku kueh?

I didn't expect that I would get so excited seeing the ice cream man. Still remember as kids we would all run to the ice cream man as he rings his bell. 30 years later, I learnt to be more subdued so I could only walk briskly with my heart pounding and eyes firmly fixated on him hoping he won't ride off before I get my ice cream.

It's 1:30pm at the peak of the direct sun, and he's out out under his yellow umbrella peddling his $1 nolstagic multi-flavoured ice cream wrapped using the old school colourful bread.

I hope he's still there outside MOE Building now. If you're nearby, drop by and support his honest livelihood and our local street food!