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Featuring Fat Cow, Alkaff Mansion Ristorante, Dancing Crab (The Grandstand), Hua Ting Restaurant, IZY Dining & Bar, Godiva Chocolatier (Takashimaya), Joe & Dough (Leisure Park Kallang), [email protected], Gyuu+ (Emporium Shokuhin), Dancing Crab (VivoCity)
Justin Teo
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#justinthoughts❤️] Happy mid autumn everyone 😊 This is my second favorite traditional Chinese festival.
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As little kids, we carried lanterns and walked around the dimly lit neighborhood with other neighbors in the evening. As older kids, we played with sparkles or candles at a nearby playground with our classmates who typically stay nearby. As adults, we understood that it signifies reunion and thanksgiving, as families come together and exchange gifts such as these mooncakes.
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This may be the last day to give a box of mooncakes to your loved ones, but the spirit of thanksgiving and spending quality time with family lasts whole year round. Happy mid autumn once again everyone, 中秋节快乐 😊

- Desmond Tutu. Happy weekend everyone!
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(Pictured is an off-menu Rose Latte complimentary from the cafe. This isn't your latte with rose syrup. Using real rose petals, it was very strong in its rose fragrance that also came with a raw herby taste to it)

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Thanks for being my best meal partner, because she knows what I need to do before eating and while eating, and that I get to eat her food because she's a small eater 😋
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But the real reason is cos I enjoy her company the most. Happy Valentine's Day again wifey!

Thank you so much! 🙇🙇
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You know I'm a fan of Irvin's salted egg potato chips and especially their salted egg fish skin, and anything with a local twist in flavours. So I'm looking forward to trying these tonight :)
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#saltedegg #potatochips

I never liked chwee kueh when I was a kid.. I thought it was an old man's food. Maybe that's true, cos as I got closer to being an old man, I grew to love them as my favorite breakfast item. Unfortunately I don't eat them often for a few reasons - i) I don't take breakfast on weekdays; ii) there aren't many good chwee kueh around my neighborhood when I just want to have a leisurely-paced breakfast nearby on weekends.

But thankful for Jian Bo chwee kueh, which is definitely my favorite chwee kueh! Those steamed rice flavour has such a soft texture.. mushy to the bite. It's one of those chwee kueh I don't mind eating without chai por, yet I must eat this with the chai por because the chai por here is so good! I think it has been fried under decent fire, hence the aroma. It's quite oily though, so eat with moderation!

Thanks to my friend @spottypuff who packed Jian Bo chwee kueh back for me from Tiong Bahru market. 📸: Fuji X-T1

I was still satisfied with the compromise because I love Hokkaido scallops - I frequently buy them from supermarkets to pan sear them myself with butter and salt, or to air fry them after wrapping with bacon.
Most of the scallops here are well-seared, some less, and wasn’t too salty (I tend to pan-sear mine with too much salt). There is still some scallop sweetness within, unlike many restaurants that serve scallops that are almost totally deprived of any natural sweetness within them. Granted, there are many high end meals with really fresh scallops that are full of sweet scallop juices, but that would require fresh live scallops and not something you would expect out of this bowl that only cost $18 nett. I like the cream base, that has a touch of onion for a spicy accent. I like the maple that’s coated on the toast, but the toast was really tough so I would prefer them to be served slightly warmed to make it easier on my jaws.
This place is new so they are still improving operationally to handle the lunch crowd. I was however impressed by the sincerity of the service though. Although they were a little overwhelmed today, boss @hungrydarren was there to ensure everyone was well taken care of. I was standing at another table and chatting with them about their dishes (I happened to know them), and a server walked up and answered all my questions – good initiative :)

I was searching for a lunch place that can accommodate 11 people with diverse taste for this Friday, so some of us went to Ninja Bowl and did a first tasting today.

They do have a interesting menu - bowls of mains with sides, and you get to choose to have them with quinoa, ninja rice, or salad.

My colleague opted for this 24 hour slow cooked beef cheek with onsen egg and ninja rice, which is a mix of white and brown rice. I didn't share her food so I have to rely on her testimony - she said the beef were fork tender, but felt there were too little ninja rice, even for the appetite of a lady. She also felt that the healthier sides pictured could be warmer given that hers is a rice bowl instead of a salad or quinoa bowl.

This bowl including ninja rice costs $16 nett. Pretty good price I thought.

They also have a brunch menu, which I thought were interesting. I ordered a creamed Hokkaido scallops with toast, but there are many others which I would explore when I'm visiting again.

When I had my first bingsu at this new Korean place at Star Vista, I understood what it was all about. These are really fine, to the extent that I can't feel any grain of ice.. It's like closing your mouth onto cold cotton candy.

I then discussed this with my wife - We started with ice kachang, then the Taiwanese snow ice (雪花冰) came along as a finer version of shaved ice and upped the competition although at a more premium ice, and then came bingsu which is even finer than the Taiwanese snow ice. Are all bingsu that fine? One key assumption under the Pillar 1 capital framework of Basel II capital rules is that loans are infinitely granular - just like this ice, "infinitely granular". I needed to be confident that this is something worth trying before I posted this. As I needed a few independent opinions I brought along @lainesy_ as well, who has more experience with bingsu. She agreed it's infinitely granular indeed, like biting into clouds as @cptslowyeo described. Last evening, I went to Waterway Point and had bingsu at One Ice Cafe, and found that indeed Chi Bing's ice were finer.

Though I'm still new to the Bingsu scene I'm confident that the ice here is as fine as it can get. But this chocolate favoured bingsu pictured here is a mistake, do not order this because the tougher brownies and crispy waffle biscuits do not do justice to the soft ice here. For a more seamless consistency, opt for the standard peanut bingsu to other mochi. A little pricey though, it's $10.50 nett for a smaller bowl of the peanut mochi. There's an option for a larger bowl at a few dollars more.

I'm sure there are many more experienced bingsu patrons here. If there are any that I should try it, or you think it's better, do let me know!

When I had my first bingsu at this new Korean place at Star Vista, I understood what it was all about. These are really fine, to the extent that I can't feel any grain of ice.. It's like closing your mouth onto cold cotton candy.

I then discussed this with my wife - We started with ice kachang, then the Taiwanese snow ice (雪花冰) came along as a finer version of shaved ice and upped the competition although at a more premium ice, and then came bingsu which is even finer than the Taiwanese snow ice. Are all bingsu that fine? One key assumption under the Pillar 1 capital framework of Basel II capital rules is that loans are infinitely granular - just like this ice, "infinitely granular". I needed to be confident that this is something worth trying before I posted this. As I needed a few independent opinions I brought along @lainesy_ as well, who has more experience with bingsu. She agreed it's infinitely granular indeed, like biting into clouds as @cptslowyeo described. Last evening, I went to Waterway Point and had bingsu at One Ice Cafe, and found that indeed Chi Bing's ice were finer.

Though I'm still new to the Bingsu scene I'm confident that the ice here is as fine as it can get. But this chocolate favoured bingsu pictured here is a mistake, do not order this because the tougher brownies and crispy waffle biscuits do not do justice to the soft ice here. For a more seamless consistency, opt for the standard peanut bingsu to other mochi. A little pricey though, it's $10.50 nett for a smaller bowl of the peanut mochi. There's an option for a larger bowl at a few dollars more.

I'm sure there are many more experienced bingsu patrons here. If there are any that I should try it, or you think it's better, do let me know!

It's topped with strawberries and almond croustillant, while raspberry sorbet is served on the side.

You may notice that the things that came with each course have been chosen to complement one another. In this case the citrus sorbet was chosen to balance the denser and sweeter chocolate cake.

The meal came with amuse bouche and petition fours as well, but not pictured since they may be different everyday.

Overall a very well-thought out meal in a quiet and spacious ambience. I'll dine here again if I'm staying at Banyan Tree Bali.

It's topped with strawberries and almond croustillant, while raspberry sorbet is served on the side.

You may notice that the things that came with each course have been chosen to complement one another. In this case the citrus sorbet was chosen to balance the denser and sweeter chocolate cake.

The meal came with amuse bouche and petition fours as well, but not pictured since they may be different everyday.

Overall a very well-thought out meal in a quiet and spacious ambience. I'll dine here again if I'm staying at Banyan Tree Bali.