Lemak Boys

55 Wishlisted
~$15/pax
Born out of a desire to preserve local heritage flavours and recipes, Lemak Boys is Les Amis Group’s newest casual dining concept that shines the spotlight on local favourite dishes with a Peranakan twist.

1 Scotts Road
#03-10 Shaw Centre
Singapore 228208

(open in Google Maps)

Sunday:
11:30am - 02:30pm
06:00pm - 09:00pm

Monday:
11:30am - 02:30pm
06:00pm - 09:00pm

Tuesday:
11:30am - 02:30pm
06:00pm - 09:00pm

Wednesday:
11:30am - 02:30pm
06:00pm - 09:00pm

Thursday:
11:30am - 02:30pm
06:00pm - 09:00pm

Friday:
11:30am - 02:30pm
06:00pm - 09:00pm

Saturday:
11:30am - 02:30pm
06:00pm - 09:00pm

View Address & Details

Reviews

From the Burpple community

They started with some controversy with the Peranakan style of nasi lemak, but don’t stop you from coming here because of this.

I do agree with some of the reviews here, the price tag of $12.50 seems wasn’t impress me a lot.

The set comes with lemak Rice, chicken berempah, sambal prawn, sayur lodeh, vegetable omelette, otah otah, roasted peanuts, fried anchovies, sliced cucumber and sambal.

This is almost the same things as other offer. While the taste itself was delicious and tasty, but you could probably getting the same taste elsewhere with cheaper price.

Brought to us by the Les Amis Group, Lemak Boys shines the spotlight on local favourites with a Peranakan twist, and yes, that includes their somewhat controversial Nasi Lemak. Burppler Veronica Phua ordered the Premium Nasi Lemak ($18.50) and thought "the essential components were done really well. While the rice was very fragrant and flavourful without being heavy or oily, the sweetish sambal proved a shiok match. The fancier items of fried chicken (it was well-marinated and crispy), omelette and otah (both had an appealing thickness), and the prawns with savoury chilli sambal, met our expectations too."

Photo by Burppler Veronica Phua

5 Likes

Quite a variety of flavours with multiple chilli elements. Not sure if it's worth $12.50 though. The rendang was more your typical chicken curry. At least the sambal was poppin

It boasted a large piece of fried firm-fleshed fish blanketed in a thick, sour-spicy rempah gravy that I found extremely appetising. Served with plain white rice, the set also included a chunky deepfried yam and chicken patty, fried long beans and another stir-fry of tempeh with hardboiled egg in sweetish sambal. On the side was a bowl of tasty “hae bee”-heavy, not-overly-lemak Sayur Lodeh.

Conclusion: I enjoyed this and the “Premium Nasi Lemak” equally, so it will come down to what I‘m in the mood for on my future visits.

2 Likes

Popped into the newly-open @lemakboys the other night and ordered their “Premium Nasi Lemak” ($18.50) for dinner. I know most people say the Basic version of the former is good enough but I’m not “most people” because clearly, I’m greedier 😂. Anyway, and I shared everything.
The essential components were done really well. While the rice was very fragrant and flavourful without being heavy or oily, the sweetish sambal proved a shiok match. Scoring 10 out of 10 for freshness and crunch were the other essentials of the peanuts and ikan bilis. The fancier items of fried chicken (it was well-marinated and crispy), omelette and otah (both had an appealing thickness), and the prawns with savoury chilli sambal, met our expectations too.

2 Likes

Heard about the controversies about the “Peranakan” aspect of the establishment before they had opened — but that did not quite change my interest on heading down to Lemak Boys to give their offerings a try; after all I am one who is usually all in for great Nasi Lemak despite being not too much of a rice person, but I would not say no to one that is well-executed with finesse and skill.

Given its price tag at $12.80, it’s difficult not to carry expectations even for the most basic version of the Nasi Lemak they have to offer here; after all, one would already be paying for a premium here against those served up at coffee shops and hawker centres. Coming with other condiments such as omelette, Otah, Fried Drumstick, Ikan Bilis, Peanuts and Sambal, it felt like it was lacking that artisan quality that the price tag seemed to have suggest — while the rice was sufficiently moist and did carry a light whiff of coconut aroma, it felt a tad too tame; easily overpowered by everything else on the plate. And then moving on to the condiments, while the Otah does remind me of the thick Muar Otahs which was something I appreciated, the Fried Chicken was served at room temperature; understandably so considering how most of the condiments have been prepared before-hand and placed on the counter only to be picked up and plated upon order, but I do have had crispier chicken drumsticks/wings from mom-and-pop Nasi Lemak specialty stalls, let alone an establishment that seems to suggest that they serve up artisanal Nasi Lemak — a shame considering I liked how it carried a light lemongrass fragrance and a slight hint of turmeric in its marination which was rather flavourful. Thought the omelette felt rather pedestrian; would have much preferred a sunny side-up though I am not quite sure if they are trying to stick to the Peranakan roots here, though thankfully the Ikan Bilis provided just enough crunch and saltish flavour for a good contrast with the other elements on the plate. The sambal provided a light kick of spiciness that should be manageable to most, though may be a little odd for those used to the sweet sambal more commonly found at other places.

Considering the hype built up for their Nasi Lemak, it felt like a mix of hits and misses — a little disappointing for an artisan establishment with a focus on Nasi Lemak. Don’t get it wrong; it’s pretty serviceable and a rather decent plate, though considering the likes of The Coconut Club or even Punggol Nasi Lemak’s more upscale concept at Capitol Piazza, I would have wished that they could have delivered more than it did at that price tag ...

1 Like
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