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~$20/pax
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Now this is another fish soup in the east I would travel to eat! Their fresh fish soup ($4.50) is filled with a variety of ingredients, including fresh fish slices that had such s good bite! The fish slices were naturally sweet as well. What's best is their soup broth that not only has the taste of fish stock, it took on the flavour of fried egg pieces as well. Now that's one good fish soup to be added to my list!

I’ve professed my adoration for @sushirosingapore stellar shrimp tempura before, but I just discovered that they have it in nigiri form too. The standalone version is five for five dollars, but the nigiri clocks in at a pair for $2.30++.⠀

The same commendably fresh shrimp are battered in a airy, crunchy tempura batter before being deep fried till the right shade of golden brown. The well cooked, mildly vinegary sushi rice helps to absorb some of the moderate amounts of oil that the tempura batter absorbed, and really turns the satisfaction factor up to eleven. ⠀

Dunk the shrimp in some ponzu sauce, drop a diminutive dollop of wasabi on top, and you have a simple yet stunning sushi that practically demands fourth & fifth servings. All that at just under three bucks a plate. This has been the best trade deal in the history of trade deals, maybe ever.

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@sushirosingapore occasionally do limited time promos, and this pair of thick cut unagi nigiris ($4.90++ a plate) were rolled out to celebrate Singapore’s 57th National Day. I adore unagi as is, but THICK CUT unagi? Oh yes please, I’ll take your entire stock.⠀

The naturally oily, mildly briny slices of freshwater eel were brushed with teriyaki sauce, broiled impeccably, and glazed one more time with teriyaki sauce. The result is a deeply umami slice of unagi that’s supremely satisfying in every aspect: it’s stunningly sapid, smoky, tantalisingly sweet, and fabulously fatty. The best part is the extra T H I C C cut of eel that gives so much more for your teeth to bite into, and much more substance to satisfy your gluttony.⠀

The only caveat here is the lack of consistency. My first order of unagi was divinely sublime, but my second order brought me crashing back down to earth. It was half eel flesh, half eel pin-bones. The marvellous mouthfeel was ruined by the plethora of bones in the thick slice of eel, and I was torn between trying to spit the bones out or just swallow & hope for the best.⠀

Still, don’t let my slightly subpar second serving of eel, or the fact that the promo period for these thick beauties is over, dEELete any cravings you may have to try Sushiro’s unagi offerings. They’ll have you fEELing electrified, I promise.

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If you’ve never tried raw cuttlefish before, you definitely have to. @sushirosingapore Cuttlefish with Soy Sauce ($2.90++) is a great, safe option to test the waters with, as Sushiro’s fresh sashimi grade cuttlefish is a pretty safe bet. So, what’s the difference between cuttlefish sashimi & squid sashimi?⠀

Firstly, raw cuttlefish has a hard, almost unrelenting chew as opposed to the soft, snappy bite of raw squid. Cuttlefish is great resistance training for your jaw muscles, as you do need a copious amount of chewing to break it down. Well then, why go through the arduous effort just to eat something that sounds inferior to squid? Well, the flavours of cuttlefish is worth chewing for.⠀

Squid is quite mild tasting, but cuttlefish has more complexity. It’s briny, very subtly sweet, and it’s surprisingly creamy. The cuttlefish breaks down after chewing into a creamy mass that coats your palate, making for a very interesting mouthfeel. It’s definitely an acquired taste due to the odd texture, but I quite enjoy it. One thing I didn’t enjoy was the addition of grated ginger to this. All that chewing made the ginger even spicier, and it went up my nose eventually. Yeah nah, keep the ginger off the sushi and over to the side, thanks.

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Some sushi snobs sneer at @sushirosingapore , but I find it to be a satisfactory sushi spot perfect for getting your sushi craves satiated. Two of their basic sushis ($2.30++ each) are paragons of Sushiro’s entire philosophy: simple, passable sushi that’s affordable.⠀

The Broiled Fatty Salmon Belly comes as a single nigiri, which is understandable considering the cut of salmon and the pricing. The salmon belly was indeed fatty, and blowtorching it seared some of the fat and added a little char, enhancing the flavour of this fatty fish. Next to no chewing was required, as the fat in the salmon belly starts to melt in your mouth, causing the slice of salmon belly to disintegrate. The grated ginger topping was quite weird atop the salmon belly, almost akin to finding a shark in a tree. You don’t know how it got there, but you just know that it’s not supposed to be there.⠀

The Tuna With Soy Sauce met expectations, with two nigiris sporting decently sized slices of akami (lean tuna). The tuna was nice and fresh, with an enjoyable meaty bite. Brushed down with soy sauce and garnished with scallions, all that was needed was a dollop of wasabi. Sushiro’s selection is extensive, so there’s a lot more stellar sushi than the torched salmon belly & tuna to savour.

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Got the $4.50 portion. Quite alot. Changed the noodles to kway teow. Wantons were tasty. Overall value for money 👍

Pretty simple dish, noodles with minced meat and shredded cucumbers. $4 for this. The portion size is good and filling for 1 person. The noodles are on the softer side, not the firm al dente chewy type. Overall okay for filling the stomach.

Love these dumplings, nicely fried crispy on the outside. The pork & chives fillings was generous, juicy and not too salty. Good price 9pc at $5.

Found this hole in the wall outlet in Bedok Center selling Hat Yai Thai food instead of your run of the mill Pad Thai. It was helmed by two Thai ladies so this must be authentic Thai food. With that thought, I bought their Fried Chicken Rice ($4.80) and Fried Chicken Skin ($3.60).

The chicken rice is not like any other types of chicken rice in Singapore. Visually it looked like the version you can get in Bangkok from Bib Gourmand winner Polo Fried Chicken. But unfortunately taste wise, it is nowhere near. The rice was basically soya sauce, lemon grass and some other spices. No taste of chicken. The fried chicken, which came topped with fried shallots, was dry like tree bark. I assure you that you can get better ones from pasar malam. The saving grace was the sweet and tangy chilli sauce which caused me to salivate more and perhaps made swallowing easier.

The fried chicken skin was biscuit like crispy. But it had some strange funky taste like unwashed meat. I gave up at the third piece and threw away the rest.

Won’t be returning. By the way I discovered that they charged me 20cents more for food container even though I dined in.

Since you are already here, you should also try some of their maki as well. They actually have quite a wide range of maki available here.

Each pieces comes with juicy unagi with it’s authentic sauce.

There wasn’t many Japanese restaurants in Bedok area and it is interesting to find this standalone Japanese restaurant at Bedok South, beside The Marketplace @ 58.

Started as a Japanese fish market selling Japanese ingredients for sashimi and sushi. Now they have converted the shop and open for dine in as well.

They have a very valuable lunch set available Monday to Thursday from 11:30am to 4pm, which comes with miso soup and hot green tea.

A very simple rice bowl with pieces of karaage chicken, dip with some mayonnaise sauce.

A well know name across many hawker centre and of course it always come to your mind whenever you come to Bedok for some foods.

The queue always formed here even before the usual dinner time in the afternoon, and you could easily see people getting a few packages of it.

They no longer selling at lesser portion, now selling with either 3 or 4 pieces. As always, they added lots of cai po on top of it. The chwee kueh remain very soft. Perfect match with the chili paste.